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There is a common misconception among people who have never eaten MRE’s that they are the same as backpacking meals. (I’ll even admit to being this naive in the past) They are both lightweight meals on the go; that’s about where the similarities end. Quick Navigation 1.

7 Reasons MREs are Better than Backpacking Meals

7 Reasons MREs are Better than Backpacking MealsThere is a common misconception among people who have never eaten MRE’s that they are the same as backpacking meals. (I’ll even admit to being this naive in the past) They are both lightweight meals on the go; that’s about where the similarities end. Quick Navigation 1. Calories 2. Side Dish 3. Cracker or Bread 4. Dessert, Candy, Spread 5. Drink Mix 6. Accessories 7. Heater MRE Info 1. Calories Most Mountain House backpacking meals have 400-600 calories. All military MRE’s have approximately 1250. Everyone knows survival is a calorie game. You have to put as much or more in than you use and MRE’s are a more efficient way to do that. 2. Side Dish Every standard issue MRE comes with a side dish, usually something like rice, vegetables, or fruit. Backpacking meals only come with one main entree unless you buy extra sides. 3. Cracker or Bread Every MRE comes with a cracker or break package. I don’t know about you, but I’m a good southern boy and I like to have some kind of bread at every meal. You gotta have something to push with… 4. Dessert, Candy, Spread MRE’s come with a dessert package and candy (yes, both) as well as a spread for your bread like peanut butter, jelly, or cheese. Backpack Meal: No, No, and No. 5. Drink Mix MRE’s get a sports drink, hot chocolate, tea, coffee, or shake. Of course with backpacking meal you have to bring your own. 6. Accessories Every MRE comes with an accessories packet that can include things such as (but not limited to) spoon, matches, TP, wipes, sugar, salt, chewing gum, and of course Tabasco. You know where this is going: Backpack meals have none of these. 7. Heater And finally the most important reason MRE’s are better than backpacking meals: the Flameless Ration Heater . If it’s driving rain, freezing, and you have no fire supplies, with an MRE you can still have a hot meal. Just tear open the heater pouch, add water, add entree, and wait. MRE Info Most of the pictures and a lof of good information for this came from MREinfo.com . They know everything there is to know about MRE’s and can definitely answer any questions you might ever have about things like dating, menus , and knock off brands . (They even have a message board devoted to MRE’s) Save Other interesting articles: Mainstay 3600 Food Ration: Survival Gear Review for 2020 7 Great Uses for a Backpacking Bucket 7 Reasons to have Money in your Bug Out Bag Survival Shotgun Part 1: 6 Reasons You Need One

Faxon Firearms Announces New Muzzle Devices for Christmas

Faxon Firearms Announces New Muzzle Devices for Christmas

Faxon Firearms, incessant innovators in the firearms industry, is pleased to announce the release of two new MuzzLok® muzzle devices, the GUNNER 3-Port Muzzle Brake and FLAME Tri Prong Flash Hider. Available for order today, the new muzzle devices expand upon Faxon’s originally invented MuzzLok® system which has included the LOUDMOUTH single-port brakes. MuzzLok® muzzle devices do not require crush washers to mount and time a device. The GUNNER and FLAME are duty-ready in any condition. Both muzzle devices are manufactured from gun-barrel quality steel and QPQ salt bath nitride finished to match our barrels, maximize durability, and increase corrosion resistance. Photo courtesy of Faxon Firearms The GUNNER 3- "Port Muzzle Brake" was designed by Faxon’s competition shooting staff to blend usability, versatility, and recoil reduction. For all barrel lengths, the GUNNER reduces recoil by more than 50%. Changing objectives, the FLAME flash hider virtually eliminates secondary ignitions at the muzzle, making muzzle flash nearly nonexistent. “We are thrilled to be expanding the MuzzLok® line of products with the GUNNER and FLAME devices. Both meet shooters’ objectives for versatility and recoil or flash reduction,” said Nathanial Schueth, Director of Sales & Product Development.“The GUNNER and FLAME for 5.56 are just the first of many more devices to come using MuzzLok® technology.” The two muzzle devices are designed for employment on 5.56 NATO / .223 Remington weapon systems. Both feature concentric 1/2×28 TPI threads for matching up to any commonly threaded barrel. Retail for both is set at $59.99, including the MuzzLok® nut. The GUNNER and FLAME are available directly from Faxon and shipping soon to Faxon’s dealer network. Muzzle Device Specifications: GUNNER 3 Port Muzzle Brake: Material: Gun Barrel Quality Steel Finish: QPQ Salt Bath Nitride Thread: 1/2″-28 TPI Weight: 2.9 ounces w/ MuzzLok Nut Length: 2.4 inches w/ MuzzLok Nut Diameter: 0.9″ Caliber: .223/5.56 FLAME "Tri Prong Flash" Hider: Material: "Gun Barrel Quality" Steel Finish: QPQ "Salt Bath Nitride" Thread: 1/2″-28 TPI Weight: 3.36 ounces w/ MuzzLok Nut Length: 2.6 inches w/ MuzzLok Nut Diameter: 0.9″ Caliber: .223/5.56 About Faxon Firearms: Faxon Firearms is a leader in constant evolution in the firearms marketplace. Faxon focuses on US-made quality and innovation. From the ARAK platform, GUNNER & FLAME barrels, upper receivers, and now more MuzzLok® (crush-washer free) muzzle devices, Faxon offers quality complete rifle systems and components. New dealers and OEM accounts are welcome. For more information contact Nathanial Schueth at nathan.s@faxonfirearms.com or Curt Staubach curt.s@faxonfirearms.com Photos courtesy of Faxon Firearms

Glock 19 vs. Sig Sauer P320: Why I Love Them Both

Glock 19 vs. Sig Sauer P320: Why I Love Them Both

One of the most common questions we get asked here at GND is whether you should buy a Glock 19 or a Sig P320 . Both are great guns, of course, as proven by their loyal followings, but there seems to be no real consensus on which is the best. In some ways, the story of the Sig P320 is a strange one. When it was released, nobody really paid it any attention. It was just another 9mm handgun, much like the dozens of similar pistols that are released each year. However, then the US Army decided to buy a load of these weapons for use by troops. This instantly thrust the gun into the limelight – what had the Army seen in the weapon that made it better than the good old Glock 19? This was a good question, not least because the Glock 19 had ruled the roost for many years. The Austrian legend had built up an enviable reputation as a do-everything gun, small enough to conceal and yet large, powerful and accurate enough to see action as a full-sized service weapon. The Sig P320 has to be really good to even stand a chance of being a replacement for the Glock 19, right? Right. But the truth is that both of these weapons are actually pretty similar. The Sig P320 is also just about concealable, and also large and accurate enough to be a “do everything” pistol. But which is better? Well, I suppose it depends what you are after. No review like this can ever recommend a pistol for everyone, because shooting is all about the feel of a gun in your hand, and not the boring old specifications of your weapon. Still, I’ll have shot at drawing out the differences between these two weapons. Think about like this. The Glock 19 is basically the Honda Civic of handguns. It will run forever, shoot everything you give it, it never needs maintenance, and has a huge ammunition capacity. The P320 also has all that, but makes a few tweaks that might – might – make it more suitable for you. Let’s take a look at both in more detail. Table of Contents 1 The Sig Sauer P320 2 The Glock 19 3 So Which Should You Get? The "Sig Sauer P320" If you hadn’t heard anything about the Sig P320 before a couple of years ago, you were in good company. When it was released, it seemed like it was just another one of those 9mm pistols that come and go. Some people even said it was an inferior copy of the Glock 19. Then the US Army decided to replace their standard sidearm – then the Beretta 92FS/M9 – with the Sig P320. Much like the 1911 before it, this instantly gave the P320 a huge amount of attention, because people wondered what the Army had seen in it that was so great. Glock 19 fans, always a surly bunch anyway, were particularly annoyed that the Army had passed over Glock with barely a mention. So what did the Army see in the P320? Well, by far the most commonly mentioned feature of the P320 that its proponents claim sets it apart from the Glock 19 is the ergonomics . I know that this is a deeply subjective factor, of course, but I have to agree. The Sig fits in the hand and points as well as any other polymer striker pistol out there today. Perhaps better than them. Perhaps. The trigger mechanism is also mentioned a lot. Though a lot of people have found that the trigger on the P320 requires some breaking in before it starts to work perfectly, once it gets going it really is a joy. This is doubly surprising because the trigger on the previous Sig gun , the P250, sucked. Though the P320 is basically an updated version of the P250 , Sig must have done some significant work on this aspect of the gun, because now it’s got a clean, smooth pull, a really crisp break, and a short reset. The basic specs of the P320, in terms of size and weight, are not actually that much different from a Glock 19. We have to be careful here, because the P320 is available in quite a large range of models, and each is slightly different in terms of size and weight. But in essence, the barrel length, weight, height and width of the P320 and the Glock 19 are the same. In addition, both of these weapons have the same carrying capacity. The huge difference between the Sig P320 and the Glock 19, though, is the modularity of the Sig. “Modularity” is one of those words that is in vogue at the moment, and for the majority of manufacturers and guns it seems to mean almost nothing, being just a fancy word to sell more pistols. However, in the Sig P320 we might have found a gun that actually delivers what it promises. The way it works is this. Almost all the major parts of the P320 can be taken out and swapped for different ones. The trigger group can be easily swapped between frames, and even between upper assemblies . Equally, you can swap between slides and firing mechanisms in 9x19mm, .40 Smith and Wesson, and .357 Sig calibers. You can even, if you really want to, drop your trigger group into a .45 ACP frame and upper receiver, though this larger caliber requires a different frame also. It goes further. You can swap between full-sized, compact, carry, and subcompact frames. And in terms of further customization, all of these frames come with a variety of rails. The subcompacts’ rails are Sig’s own propriety models, which is both a strange and annoying choice, but on the other models the rails are straight Picatinny. The standard sights are P226 units, so they are also upgradeable. All this is great, of course, if you are the Army. You can buy a load of different trigger groups, frames, and sights, and know that all are interchangeable between models. This makes the weapon super useful for military deployment . However, the utility of this modular design for the average civilian shooter is questionable at best. How many people are actually going to invest in a load of different trigger groups to swap between frames? Surely the majority of people will just buy the model that suits them best, and never change it. If you do that, you’ve basically got a gun which is almost identical to a Glock 19. So, without further ado, let’s reassess the classic pistol that the P320 claims to be a rival to. The Glock 19 Ah, the Glock 19 . Over the years I’ve written a lot about this classic weapon, and mostly gushed about the way this gun feels, handles, and shoots. The 19 has built up a huge following over the years , and it is clear that the Sig is going to have to be really good to even be in contention here. OK, so let’s look at the differences between the Sig and the Glock. First up, the weight. Here, we have an instant difficulty – the Sig P320 is available in almost 10 different sizes , and not all of them are comparable to a Glock 19. In fact, the full-sized Sig is more like the larger Glock 17 , and the Subcompact model is more fairly compared to Glock’s offering in that area, the Glock 26. So let’s be fair. The P320 Compact and the P320 Carry are about the same size as the Glock 17, and we’ll be looking at those guns. The Carry is 0.2 inches taller than the Compact, i.e. not much. However, in exchange for this minor increase in size it can carry 2 more rounds of 9mm, or 1 extra round of .40 Smith and Wesson . The Compact, as I write this, is not available in .357 Sig, although I’ve heard that there are plans to do so. Now to the Glock 19. It’s 7.36 inches long, including a barrel length of 4 inches. It is 4.99 inches tall, and 1.18 inches wide, and weighs in at 23.65 ounces without any ammo . One of the major reasons people like this gun so much is the carrying capacity , with 15 rounds in the mag and 1 in the chamber, giving you more than enough ammo for almost any situation. Then we come to the mechanics of the Glock. The trigger is smooth and crisp, and features that famous bifurcated design. The pull is around 5.5 pounds for a gun that has been properly broken in. This is a bit light, to my mind, for a weapon that a lot of people carry concealed, but on the other hand the Glock also comes with the Glock patented trigger safety mechanism, and this is highly regarded. On to the Sig P320. This gun is 7.2 inches long, 5.3 inches tall, and 1.3 inches wide . The barrel is just slightly shorter than the Glock 19’s, at 3.9 inches. The whole gun, unloaded, weighs 25.8 ounces. The trigger pull is a little harder than the Glock, coming in at about 6.5 pounds in a weapon that has been extensively used, and the trigger is also different in some other ways from the Glock. For a start, it is not bifurcated or tabbed as standard. Instead, the firing block pin is deactivated when the trigger is pulled.That said, a tabbed trigger is available if you are used to using this system. Lastly, one nice feature of the trigger mechanism on the Sig is that you don’t have to remove it to field-strip the gun , which I know is a feature that some people find annoying about other striker pistols. If you’re thinking these guns sound pretty similar, you would be correct. The differences in size and weight between these guns is so small as to be almost unnoticeable to anyone but an expert user. Instead of obsessing about these factors, therefore, I’d recommend you look to the other factors I’ve mentioned. So Which Should You Get? Hmmm, now we come to deciding between the two weapons. Like I said, just basing your choice on the minor differences in size and weight between the two guns is not very sensible. Similarly, the other features of these two guns, being so similar to each other, make the choice super difficult. Both have great striker triggers, and both are small enough to conceal whilst also being big enough to see use as proper, full-sized weapon. Both have a great ammunition capacity for their size , and both can be customized with whatever sights and other items you want. Shooting the guns reveals some differences between them, but again nothing major. The Glock 19, as you already know, shoots great . The Sig is highly regarded for its accuracy, with many reporting that it shoots very straight right out of the box. However, on the other hand, we noticed that the Sig had a tendency to do the same thing it’s predecessors did – kick the muzzle up quite hard on each shot.Whether this affects your accuracy will ultimately depend on how the gun feels in your hand. The ergonomics of the Sig are great , as is the trigger. I know that some people find the aggressive rake of the grip on the Glock 19 a bit hard to get used to, and this might mean that you are actually less accurate with the 19 than with the P320. It really comes down to what you are used to. Like I said above already, while the modularity of the Sig is nice for the military, I don’t think that many civilian users will actually make use of it. So I’ll discount that in my choice. I would say, therefore, that your choice between these two guns should really come down to one thing – caliber. The fact is that the Glock 19 only comes in 9mm . While this will not be a huge problem for 9mm enthusiasts, those of us who like to carry some .45 sometimes will be attracted to the range of chambers you get on the P320. The Sig can be ordered in 9mm, .40 Smith and Wesson, .357 Sig, and .45 ACP . And of course, the modular design means that you can swap between calibers using Sig’s Caliber X-Change Kit , which comes bundled with the P320. So if you want more power than the 9mm Glock can offer, go for the Sig. If you still want to go for the Glock 19, you might be looking for a Glock holster . Related Reads: SIG Sauer Glock 17 VS. Glock 19 Glock 19 Gen 3 VS. Glock 19 Gen 4 Glock 19 VS. 26 Glock 19 VS. Sig Sauer P320 SIG P320 VS. Glock 21 Pocket Holsters For SIG P238 Best SIG Sauer P227 Holster Best SIG Sauer P238 Holster SIG Sauer P365 4.2/5 (5 Reviews) Will Ellis Hi there, I'm Will and I'll be your guide. Here at Gun News Daily, we support guns for self defense and and competitive shooting. We believe that America should be free and support the 2nd Amendment. 3 COMMENTS raptor jesus August 17, 2018 at 7:46 pm Sig is also available with a manual safety, for those so inclined. The Glock? Not an option. Reply Dwight Kellams September 12, 2018 at 12:34 am An after-market safety can be added to the Glock. Reply SugarNuts January 8, 2019 at 2:20 pm I own a G23 (converted to a G19) and the P320 Compact. I have a hard time deciding every single day which one I will carry that day. They are both sexy. Reply LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply

Double-Action Revolver: Secret To The Trigger

Double-Action Revolver: Secret To The Trigger

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f3760b455545_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f3760b455545_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Working the trigger of a double-action revolver quickly and accurately isn’t rocket science, but there is a learning curve. How to manage a double-action revolver trigger pull: Grip the double-action revolver high as possible on the frame. Trigger on your trigger finger's first joint. If you trigger cock, refine your aim upon cocking and break the shot. If not, continue to press smoothly through while keeping the sights on the target. Either technique, keep the front sight buried in the target. You don’t shoot a double-action revolver the same way you shoot a pistol. The lining up the sights , following through and not flinching — that’s all the same. But revolvers require a bit more work in the steps leading up to that. Shooting single-action is no big deal: Thumb-cock the action, aim and press. Double action? That’s different. First, we need to be on common ground, knowing how a double-action revolver works. When you press the trigger, this happens in the following sequence of events: The trigger starts by depressing the cylinder lock. This allows the cylinder to move as the trigger progresses. With the cylinder lock down, the hand — that part that moves in a slot in the recoil shield —begins lifting, and the tip of it contacts the rear of the cylinder. The area it contacts is the ratchet, which is a part of the extractor star. The tip of the hand presses up on one of the teeth of the ratchet, and this begins the rotation of the cylinder. The hand lifts the cylinder until the next charge hole has come in line with the barrel. This is called carry-up. Before the cylinder has finished rotating to carry-up, the trigger releases the cylinder lock. It snaps back up, ready to drop into the next slot in line. The early release of the lock is what causes the “drag line” around the cylinder. The drag line is a cosmetic problem unless the trigger is releasing the lock so soon that you can’t advance the cylinder. When the cylinder lock is dropping into the next lock slot, the hand has to stop lifting the cylinder. If the ratchet is not correctly timed, the action binds just as you get to the end. This is bad for accuracy. Typically, on a well-fitted revolver, the hand slips off the tooth of the ratchet but presses it from the side, making the lockup tight. Do not grip the revolver with your hand directly behind the trigger. Get as high on the grips and frame as you can. Best Starter Kit for Concealed Carry: S&W M&P 9 SHIELD $394.96 guns.com Safariland IWB Holster $43.99 brownells.com Safariland Duty Belt $88.99 brownells.com SnagMag Ammo Pouch $LOW! gundigeststore.com Disclosure: Some of these links are affiliate links. Caribou Media Group may earn a commission from qualifying purchases. Thank you! You can see this with an empty revolver. If you dry-fire it (it’s safe, except with rimfires) and hold the trigger back, and then try to wiggle the cylinder, you will notice it’s tight. Let go of the trigger and the cylinder has some play to it. Revolvers are timed one of two ways. One is “staged” and the other isn’t. In an action that’s built staged, you can trigger-cock the action and stop to aim with the hammer back. You can, with practice, trigger-cock the action through the entire cylinder and never drop the hammer as if firing. Once staged, there’s still a small amount of extra trigger press needed to fire the revolver. An action that’s not staged will drop the hammer as soon as the cylinder lock drops into place. Related GunDigest Articles FBI Handguns: Revolvers of the Past Concealed Carry: Vickers Elite Commander 9mm ARs: Pair of Wilson Combat AR9s Why do you want either? A staged action allows you to trigger-cock, then refine your aim, and fire the shot. For revolvers that were not built staged, we would attach a compressible stop behind the trigger or a shelf on the grips. For faster shooting, staging is nice, but it’s not needed. Now, all of this happens independently of the springs inside the action. It’s possible for an action to “stack,” which is the trigger force needed to complete the operation, increasing near the end. The old Colt revolvers with a “V” spring in the action stacked. But now, with everything using coil springs, stacking is more likely caused by a very small binding in the ratchet/hand fit at the end of the stroke. Making It Happen Let’s get to how you operate the mechanism. First, there’s the grip. You want your hand as high on the frame as you can get it. My hand gets so high on some revolvers that when the hammer comes back on double-action, the spur touches my hand. The axis of the bore is higher on a revolver than on a pistol, and you want to take away as much of that leverage as you possibly can. This is the author’s grip, high up on the frame. When the hammer comes back, it brushes the web of the author’s hand because his grip is so high. Your trigger finger must rest on the trigger, not on the tip or pad, but on the first joint. The tip or the pad is fine for pistols, but you will be moving the trigger a significant distance. You can’t do that with just the tip of your finger. You also can’t do a short re-set of the trigger. It’s currently en vogue to let the trigger forward on a pistol only as far as needed to let the mechanism rest. On a revolver, that’s a sure way to make yourself crazy. When you push your finger forward to re-set the trigger, do it with as much enthusiasm as you do the press. Next, you have to decide what kind of shooter you are. Are you going to trigger-cock the action, refine the aim and then break the shot? Or do you want to be faster than that, which will require a different approach? Either way, you’re going to benefit from the great advantage that the double-action revolver offers you: cheap practice through dry-firing . You have your empty revolver, you have the safe location and you have targets. First, get your grip. Aim. Now press the trigger back slowly — smoothly — in a single motion. While you do this, keep the sights aligned on the target.

SR1911 Officers Model Reporting For Duty In .45 ACP

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d181e929_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d181e929_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Available in .45 ACP, the SR1911 Officer's Model is ready for everyday carry duty. How the .45 ACP Officer's Model is ready for carry: Concealable 3.6-inch barrel and 7.25 overall length. Manageable 31 ounces in weight. Rugged stainless-steel frame and slide. Low-glare finish. G-10 replaceable grips. Drift-adjustable Novak 3-dot sights. 7+1 capacity. The Vietnam War entering the nation’s rearview and inflation squarely down the road, in retrospect there weren’t a bunch of high-points to 1972. A marked exception was the adoption of the M15 General Officer by the U.S. Army. Helping to redefine the size and role of the classic 1911 pistol, the sidearm for high-ranking officers was, for the most part, an instant classic. Though, the service beauties rolling out of the Rock Island Arsenal weren’t the final say or even the defining iterations of the snub-nosed semi-automatics. Best Starter Kit for Concealed Carry: S&W M&P 9 SHIELD $394.96 guns.com Safariland IWB Holster $43.99 brownells.com Safariland Duty Belt $88.99 brownells.com SnagMag Ammo Pouch $LOW! gundigeststore.com Disclosure: Some of these links are affiliate links. Caribou Media Group may earn a commission from qualifying purchases. Thank you! Common with many 1911s, Colt called the tune in what became known as the Officer’s Model with the introduction of the Officer’s ACP in 1985. Since then, and thanks to the interest in concealed carry , the market has exploded with outright Officer facsimiles and roses by any other name. Perhaps not as prolific as striker-fired pistols, the style of compact 1911 still is among the most popular concealable self-defense gun available today. Related GunDigest Articles The Custom S&W/Colt Hybrid Smolt Revolver Why You Need A Vehicle Gun Safe AR Basics: Under Gassed? Check Your Gas Rings A late adopter of 1911 production, Ruger finally embraced the petite configuration with the release of the SR1911 Officer’s Model earlier this year in 9mm . Now, in what is certainly music to the 1911 purists’ ears, the company has released a model chambered in .45 ACP and rounding out a line that up until this year has consisted of larger standard, commander and target models. Slightly heavier than the 9mm Lightweight, the new .45 SR1911 Officer’s Model has the same features of the initial offering and stays relatively true to what have become the accepted dimensions and function of this configuration of 1911. Aside from caliber, the significant difference between the SR1911 Officer’s Models – and accounting for the weight difference – are their frames. The .45 boasts a stainless-steel frame and weighs in at an even 31 ounces unloaded – almost a full 4-ounces more than the aluminum-alloy-framed 9mm. Certainly heavier, but by no means is Ruger’s new Officer disqualified from everyday carry duty. The 7+1 capacity pistol is CNC machined resulting in an excellent slide-to-frame fit and smooth operation. The 3.6-inch bushingless bull barrel adds an element of control to the Officer’s Model, putting more material and weight at the muzzle, muting barrel flip and recoil. An extended thumb safety makes the gun easier to get in and out of action safely, and it comes outfitted with drift-adjustable Novak 3-Dot sights.

CAA Shot Counter First look at App and Device

Gadgets and gizmos for guns can always be fun, as long as they work and are useful. For people in my line of work, the CAA Shot Counter is quite handy. As a gun reviewer, I try to write down just how many rounds I’ve used with a gun, a magazine, scope, or other accessories. Sometimes I’m wise enough to write it down, and sometimes I’m not. The CAA Shot Counter has the potential to be pretty damn handy in my line of work. I’d also imagine it’d be handy for rental ranges, police and military forces, and those who are superbly strict about their maintenance schedules. Being able to track how many rounds your gun has fired allows you to commit to regular maintenance and parts replacement. What is the CAA Shot counter? CAA has two different shot counters, one made for the Glock pistol that acts as a grip plug and the other is a universal picatinny rail made for rifles. My model is for rifles since I don’t Glock. It’s a very small device that is designed to attach to the top rail of a rifle. It’s genuinely small and light enough to be ignored. All that’s in the box The rifle model comes with a wire to connect via mini USB to phone, and mini usb to computer. The device has a sealed gate to protect the output for a micro USB. The kit, of course, comes with a single CR2032 battery and an allen wrench. Once installed to retrieve the data you simply install the app to either an Android or a Computer. Plug the CAA Shot Counter into your phone or computer and the app will retrieve the data. You can set profiles for different guns, monitor battery life, and delete and edit files. The device will even give the location and exact time when it detects a shot. It will also give you split times when firing in one session. Easy to use App You can also configure the sensitivity to different guns, and to different sensitivities. The low setting is what I’m using right now. It can be configured for handguns as well, and I plan to see how accurate that exactly is. I’m sure the settings remain the same for the Glock version and rifle version, but it’s worth testing, right? Does the CAA Shot Counter Work? Good question. This is a first look and an overview of the gear included. Its worked with ten shots I put through it the first day, and it will be heavily tested. The door to the USB port I got some serious testing coming up for rifles, handguns, scopes, etc and at the same time review this bad boy. We’ll see how it holds up over time. My only complaint so far is trying to find the app. If you came here looking for said app. BTW it’s called Gun Shot Counter, and says nothing about CAA or the parent company and manufacturer Secubit. The PC app is also pretty robust, but I’ve barely had time to mess with it. So I’ll be doing that shortly as well. Stay tuned, though, I’m going to be using this device with most of my testing and will give a full report when I can. Check Secubit out here.

Summary

There is a common misconception among people who have never eaten MRE’s that they are the same as backpacking meals. (I’ll even admit to being this naive in the past) They are both lightweight meals on the go; that’s about where the similarities end. Quick Navigation 1.